Mission and History

Mission

1. To unite artists and persons interested in art and all related subjects for fellowship and understanding in promoting common aims and to assert the creative importance of art in the national and community life of Canada.

2. To improve the welfare, recognition and professional standing of practicing Canadian artists in the community

3. To promote activities which will tend to increase the appreciation, enjoyment and use of art and works of art by Canadians

4. To stimulate public interest in the arts within Canada and in the growth of Canadian culture

5. To establish, promote, support and/or encourage public art galleries, museums and other institutions and organizations engaged in activities connected with art and art appreciation

6. To assist the co-ordination and encouragement of activities of groups and individuals tending to further the objectives of the Society by providing a clearing house of information and ideas.

7. To co-operate with the National body of the Federation of Canadian Artists and with other Federation of Canadian Artists Chapters located across Canada.

8. To co-operate with organizations in Canada having similar objectives to those of this society

9. To make donations from the Society’s endeavours to charitable organizations working with the community.

10. To do all such things as are incidental or conducive to the attainment of the above mentioned objectives.

History

The not for profit Federation of Canadian Artists organization is the only survivor of a national organization that evolved from an Arts Conference held in Kingston Ontario in 1941. The first chairman was Lawren Harris, a well known Canadian artist and a member of The Group of Seven. He was followed by many other notable Canadian artists. Under the leadership of the Honorable Mark Kearley, a Vancouver Island Chapter with a membership of 300 became the largest chapter in Canada. A gallery known as “The Little Centre” was opened in 1946 in Victoria BC. and five years later a permanent site was obtained through the gift of the Spencer Mansion, thus laying the foundation for the present Art Gallery of Greater Victoria. In 1978 the Federation established a large gallery and workshop in Vancouver as a base in which to promote the objectives of the Federation. Today the Federation has a few very active chapters in British Columbia as well as one in Edmonton and another in Calgary both in the province of Alberta.

Calgary Chapter History

The Calgary Chapter had it’s first western exhibition and sale in July of 1949. The chapter was fully organized in 1981. The original members were Margaret King, Jeanette McClelland, Irene Wahl, June Montgomery, Merle Stewart, and Elaine Rathie. This chapter is a leader in western Canada for uniting artists, critics, and all persons interested in art. It also provides a clearing house for information and ideas and promotes the welfare and recognition of art in the community. It also provides donations to the community through jury fees and sales from the participating artists in shows of the highest quality. Standards are maintained through juries for active membership status. Educational and practical workshops organized by the chapter are among the many benefits of membership in this chapter. Several juried shows each year provide the members with opportunities to exhibit works of art as well as provide the general public with an insight into the artist mind and vision.